Rank:


Private

Service No(s):


14464

Regiment:


East Surrey Regiment

Unit:

12th Battalion

Returned:

No

Place of birth:

Islington - Middlesex

Occupation:

Plumbers Mate

Date of death:

11/04/1917

Cause of death:

Died of wounds

Grave or panel reference:

II. A. 20

Name of father:

Alfred

Name of siblings:

Alfred Nelson John, William, Tabitha, George H, Emmie E, Frederick James, Florence Grace, Edith Llilian, Stanley A.

Name(s) of children:

Died:

Yes

Date of birth:

29/08/1893

Place of enlistment:

Kingston Upon Thames - Surrey

Event:

France and Belgium

Age at death:

23

Cemetery or memorial:

La Clytte Military Cemetery, Belgium

Other memorial:

Royal Northern Hospital Arch

Name of mother:

Mary Jane

Name of spouse:

Address:

30 Lennox Way, Islington

Biography:

Albert Godfrey was born on 29th August in 1893, when the family lived on 11 Atherton Road, Islington; he was baptised on the same day as his older sister Tabitha on 7th January 1894 in the parish of St Anne in Tollington Park.    He was the 4th oldest of 10 children.  Albert’s parents were Alfred and Mary Jane and in 1911 they lived at 30 Lennox Way. At this time, Albert worked as a Plumber’s Mate.

Albert enlisted for war duty in Kingston Upon Thames, Surrey.  He joined the East Surrey Regiment as part of the 12th Battalion unit.  His older brother, Alfred Nelson, and his younger brother, George, also enlisted for war duty.  Alfred Nelson was in the Grenadier Guards,  Albert in the East London Regiment and George in the Royal Army Medical Corps.

At the age of 23, Albert died of his wounds on 11th April 1917.  Forces War Records state that his unit would have been involved in the following battles in 1917:  the Battles of Messines, the Battle of Pilkem Ridge, the Battle of the Menin Road and operations on the Flanders coast.  Albert’s oldest brother, Alfred, would have fought close to Menin Road just before his own death in 1914 and is commemorated on the Menin Gate war memorial in Belgium.

After his death, Albert was awarded the Victory Medal.  Eligibility for this award consisted of having been mobilised, fighting, having served in any of the theatres of operations between midnight 4th/5th August 1914, and midnight, 11/12 November 1918.  George was also awarded the British War Medal for services between 5th August and 11th November 1918.

Alfred and Mary Jane Godfrey would have been sent a Memorial Death Plaque after the war to commemorate Albert.  They, sadly, would have already received one of these plaques for their elder son Alfred Nelson John and would be receiving a further plaque for their younger son, George Harold over a year later.

Private Albert Godfrey is buried in La Clytte Military Cemetery, Belgium, reunited in the same region, Ypres, where his eldest brother Alfred is commemorated with no known grave at Menin Gate.  Albert is remembered alongside his two brothers on two Islington memorials: Royal Northern Hospital Arch and St Mellitus War Memorial.