Rank:


Corporal

Service No(s):


2591

Regiment:


Honourable Artillery Co

Unit:

1st Battalion

Returned:

No

Place of birth:

Stroud Green, London

Occupation:

Date of death:

15/09/1916  CWGC state that Leslie was 20 when he died, but dates suggest he was in fact 21 years old.

Cause of death:

Killed in action

Grave or panel reference:

VII.E.32

Name of father:

Charles Lovering

Name of siblings:

Charles Lovering, George Lovering, Florence Annie, Herbert Lovering and Alfred Lovering

Name(s) of children:

Died:

Yes

Date of birth:

30/09/1896

Place of enlistment:

Armoury House EC1

Event:

France and Flanders

Age at death:

20

Cemetery or memorial:

Ancre British Cemetery, Beaumont-Hamel, France

Other memorial:

Dame Alice Owen's School, Herts

Name of mother:

Sarah Catherine (nee Beard)

Name of spouse:

Address:

132 Stapleton Hall Rd

Biography:

Leslie Lovering Huggins was born on 30th September 1896.  He was baptised at New Court Church on 11th April 1897.  At that time his family lived at 92 Stroud Green Road. He was the fifth of six children born to Charles Lovering and Sarah Catherine Huggins. His Father was a general storekeeper.  The family later lived at 132 Stapleton Hall Road

Leslie’s occupation is unclear before enlisting at Armoury House in Finsbury on the 18th of November 1914 aged just 19.  He joined the 1st Battalion, Honourable Artillery Company. Leslie was promoted to the rank of Corporal on 12th November 1916. He was killed in action just days later between the 13th and 15th November 1916 during the Battle of the Ancre which (13–18 November 1916).  The battle was the final large British attack of the Battle of the Somme.

Letters and a list of effects included in his war records suggest that he kept a diary during his time in the army.

Leslie was a pupil at Dame Alice Owens School.  He and other Old Owenians who served and died (including Frank Reeves another soldier remembered by the organ at St Mellitus) are commemorated by a large tablet of dark-blue Cornish Delabole slate inscribed with names in gilded letters which was sited under the balcony at the back of the old School Hall at the School’s former Islington location.  When the Boys’ School was closed in the mid 1970’s, the tablet was put into storage until an Appeal raised the money to have it transferred to its current position in the grounds of current School in Potters Bar, Hertfordshire.

Leslie’s brother Alfred Lovering Huggins is one of the returning soldiers also commemorated by the organ at St Mellitus.